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Moss Paint

Posted by on Sep 28, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Moss Paint

Art, DIY What This Guy Did Might Be The Coolest But Possibly Most Illegal DIY Project Ever. The End Result… BRILLIANT. I was really confused when I heard the term Moss Graffiti. The name sounds simple enough, but really? After looking into it a little more, this may be one of the coolest things I have ever seen. Of course, we would only suggest doing this on your own property, especially because it does take a little bit of maintenance to get it going. To get started you’ll need: 3 cups of moss (washed clean of soil) 2 cups buttermilk OR 2 cups of yogurt (should be plain yogurt) 2 cups of water or beer 1/2 tsp of sugar corn syrup (optional) A blender that you probably won’t want to use other than for this. Collect about 3 cups of moss. You can sometimes buy this at a nursery but you may be able to find it right in your yard as well. Once you collect the moss, rinse it as much as possible to get rid of the soil. Break up the pieces as much as possible and put them in a blender. Add yogurt OR buttermilk, water OR beer, and sugar. Blend until this is completely smooth and has a paint like consistency. If the mixture is too runny, then add corn syrup. You don’t want this dripping all over, so add corn syrup a little bit at a time. Pour mixture into a bucket. Use a paintbrush to make the design that you’d like with your moss graffiti. Once you are done with the painting, you’ll want to check on it regularly. If you live in a very dry climate, use a spray bottle to keep the paint moist and to help promote moss growth. You can also paint over the design you did to encourage the moss growth if you do not have a spray bottle available.         Be patient! Depending on your climate, it may take a little while for your moss to grow. Check out some of these great designs below: How cool is this? I’m trying to think of a place in my yard where I can try this. It’d be a fun activity to do with kids as...

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Raised Beds for Gardening

Posted by on Aug 2, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Raised Beds for Gardening

 Raised Beds for Gardening Originally posted on Alternative Gardning The materials for a the raised bed: One 6-foot-long 4-by-4 Six 8-foot-long 2-by-6s One 10-foot-long 1-inch PVC pipe Two 10-foot-long ½-inch PVC pipes 32 3½-inch #14 wood screws and 16 ½-inch #8 wood screws One 4- by 10-foot roll of ¼-inch-mesh hardware cloth Eight 1-inch galvanized tube straps 32 cubic feet (1 1/5 cu. yd.) soil mix (look for combination of topsoil, compost, and potting soil). With a table or power saw, cut the 4-by-4 into four 16-inch-tall corner posts. Cut two of the 2-by-6s in half. Cut the 1-inch PVC pipe into four 12-inch-long pieces and the ½-inch PVC pipes into 6-foot-long pieces. Assemble pieces on a hard, flat surface. via : 10 raised bed garden...

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5 Gallon Bucket DWC system

Posted by on May 30, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

5 Gallon Bucket DWC system

5 Gallon Bucket DWC system Download these hydroponic system Design plans in pdf. Originally postedposted by homehydrosystems.com In hydroponics, DWC stands for Deep Water Culture, it’s a variation of a standard water culture system. A DWC system works exactly the same as a standard water culture system, the only difference is that the water is deeper than a standard water culture system. Though many people refer to any water culture system as a DWC system, water culture systems aren’t really considered “deep water” unless the water is at least 10-12 inched deep. Water culture systems are one of the simplest and least expensive types of hydroponic systems to build. Often times you can build a water culture system out of materials you have laying around your house, as we did for this one.  This hydroponic system design is really good for growing small to medium size plants nicely. With very few parts it’s not only inexpensive, but very easy and fast to build as well. Five Gallon Bucket DWC System Parts List Five gallon bucket with lid (you can make your own lid if you need to) Aquarium air pump Air line for the pump Aquarium air stone (or stones) Basket for the plant (you can use a standard small plastic plant pot as well) Growing media (to fill the basket or plant pot with) Black spray paint (to light proof the bucket) White spray paint (to reflect light/heat) Pluming Goop or silicone (optional) If your going to be growing small plants you can use more than one basket for multiple plants. That way you can space them evenly apart. We will be growing a medium sized plant, so we will be using one larger basket. You can buy plant baskets in many shapes and sizes form just about any hydroponics supply store. They look like a spaghetti strainer shaped as a plant pot. But instead of buying one, we used what we had laying around. We just used a regular sturdy plastic plant pot we washed and cleaned out. But first we added more holes to it with my favorite tool. A hand held soldering iron. If you don’t have one, you can get them at any radio shack or even wal-mart for under $10. You can use a drill bit to drill the holes if you need to, but burning the holes through gives you a cleaner hole, and its much faster too. If plan to build more than one hydroponic system, a soldering iron is a good tool to have around. Once you have your plant’s pot ready, you’ll need to cut a hole in the lid of the five gallon bucket to set it in. It’s best to cut a test hole in something first, because if you make it to big, you’ll need a new lid (or bigger plant pot). Draw and cut out your test hole is a piece of cardboard (side of a box etc.) and test placing the pot in it. If it fits nicely without falling through, use your test hole as the template to draw it out on your lid. Now go ahead and cut out the hole for the basket in the five gallon bucket lid. The easiest way to do that is using a rotary tool with...

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Vortex Filter DIY – Organic Fertilizer on Demand

Posted by on May 28, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Vortex Filter DIY – Organic Fertilizer on Demand

Vortex Filter DIY – Organic Fertilizer on Demand   Originally posted on theurbanfarmingguys.com transcription of “Vortex Filter DIY — Organic Fertilizer on Demand” video..by The Urban Farming Guys.. These guys right here are our vortex filters. Retail, they’d be about $4,000 apiece…DIY version, about $100..You might be able to do it for cheaper. We’ve got a 55-gallon drum, with a cone built into it, down into a shower drain. Out here, you can pull off your fertilizer every day for your garden. I’ll show you about that. We’re pulling off a pretty incredible fertilizer. We had it tested at the University of Columbia. 10-6-2 fertilizer with a ton of micro-nutrients. Right here, is our aquaponics system with IBC totes. We’re gonna be focusing on the four cylinders on the backside of the system. These are our vortex filters; we’re gonna show you how to build them from scratch. We have a pretty intense system so we built some really intense filtration. But, you’ll wanna think about these processes. Stage One, you wanna settle out as much of the solids as you can before you send it to your mechanical filter so you don’t have to change your filter pads all the time. So, we built this vortex filter where the water spins real slow, the solids settle to the bottom, we pull them off as fertilizer every day. Stage Two, whatever solids sneak by get caught in four filter pads so that the only thing left to filter now is the ammonia. Stage Three, is the biological filter. It’s where you create a lot of surface area for bacteria to grow. Ours is a bead filter. You might do a sand filter or a trickle filter. After stage three, the ammonia is turned into nitrate. It’s pumped up to the plants. Stage Four, the plants use the nitrates & send it back clean. & you can do this on a much simpler level. We wouldn’t even need the vortex filters if we just had 100 fish instead of 1,000. The rocks & the grow bed would do most of the biological filtration & we’d just to have to clean it out, whatever solids got caught up in there. But, we are on a mission to create organic fertilizer & harvest it. So, how did we build it? Alright, we make our vortex filters out of 55-gallon drums. You’re gonna have to pick up one of these 55-gallon drums. This one here had vanilla in it. You wanna make sure it’s food grade. We picked it up for $15, got four of them for $60. & first thing you do, is plumb in this shower drain right here. So, we thought, we’ll drill a 3-inch hole. Come to find out, you run into all sorts of problems..When you drill in, here’s what we drilled out..it’s got a humongous bump in it. It’s anything but flat, so if you’re trying to plumb that shower drain in, you’re gonna leak. You’re gonna leak real bad, cuz it’s just not a flat surface. So, we had to figure out a way..What do we do? So, we went to go buy some new drums..Looked & looked; went to four or five different places & could not find a single one that was flat..found some...

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How to Build a Plant Cloner From a 5 Gallon Bucket

Posted by on May 22, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

How to Build a Plant Cloner From a 5 Gallon Bucket

How to Build a Plant Cloner From a 5 Gallon Bucket   

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A Simple Way To Root Plants From Cuttings

Posted by on May 22, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

A Simple Way To Root Plants From Cuttings

A Simple Way To Root Plants From Cuttings   

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The Best Water for Your Aeroponics System

Posted by on May 21, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

The Best Water for Your Aeroponics System

The Best Water for Your Aeroponics System What type of water is best for your aeroponics system and plants? The best water for your aeroponic plants must be free of impurities such as minerals, chemicals, micro-organisms, Volatile Organic Chemicals (VOCs), and have a pH of about 6.0. Here’s a multiple choice question. Which of these water sources are good for your aeroponics system? A) Rain Water B) Distilled Water C) Spring Water D) Drinking Water (Tap or Filtered Water) E) Reverse Osmosis Water F) Softened Water Click Here for Answer First let’s eliminate the evil sources: Softened Water Avoid soft water. While water softeners are great for removing the hardness in your water, the sodium levels it leaves behind are deadly to your aeroponics system and plants. Spring Water This water is what you often find in bottled water, a well, river or just from a natural spring. It could come from an underground source or may or may not have been treated or purified. Although spring water sounds appealing, it contains minerals and possibly bacteria that could overwhelm the nutrient balance of your aeroponics  system. This is not what your plants need. The unstable water can cause plaque like deposits to build up and plug your misting nozzles like a massive heart attack. Drinking Water Drinking water is just that, it’s water intended for drinking. Drinking by whom? Humans, that’s right not for your plants. Normally this water comes from your local municipal source or bottled as drinking water. Some drinking water contains fluoride for kids growing teeth and gums. When was the last time your plants had teeth? And just about all tap water is Chlorinated. So, just like spring water, we don’t want this either. Plants that are grown indoors are especially susceptible to chemicals like chlorine. Without the presence of rain to wash away the chemicals found in faucet or tap water, they are left to build up in the container. When using water that contains high mineral levels, the minerals can form what looks like a white crud in your growing system. This deposit can cause injury to your plant leaves and roots. Tender plants are at a higher risk of damage as a result of hard-water usage. If you must use tap water, it is recommended that you allow the water to sit out in a wide mouth container for at least 24 hours to allow time for the chemicals, like chlorine to dissipate. Rain Water Were you surprised that rain water did not make the list of a good sources. Hey what’s up? Isn’t it the water source for all outdoor plants? Yes for outdoor plants in dirt. Rain water introduces too many UNKNOWNS. What’s the pH? Any minerals I don’t want. How about bird poop? Oh, yes harmful bacteria. Nitrate levels? The list goes on. The only good thing about rain water is you can get it free on the right days and if you live in a pristine area the water would have the right pH and hardness for healthy plants. Stored rainwater will contain some organic matter. If collected from your rooftop, rainwater contains traces of organic material. While the water is very clean and should run clear, it was exposed to everything on your roof. We’re not talking about chunks (these...

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How to Brew Compost Tea: The Scientific Method of Brewing

Posted by on May 15, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

How to Brew Compost Tea: The Scientific Method of Brewing

After my accumulated scientific research on Compost Tea and its benefits, this video shows how to brew compost tea in the correct manner. I have used a compound microscope to verify the beneficial bacteria and organisms in this recipe/brewer. I will outline my brewer which can be easily replicated after watching this video. This video is rather short and does not cover everything in complete detail but any questions in the comments section will be...

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12 Creative and Innovative Homemade Hydroponics Systems

Posted by on May 12, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

12 Creative and Innovative Homemade Hydroponics Systems

7 12 Creative and Innovative Homemade Hydroponics Systems Posted by Farhan Ahsan on June 29, 2014 in Garden Projects | 30,600 Views | 2 Responses The term ‘hydroponics’ is derived from two Greek words ponics (toil) and hydro (water) that started to be used since 1950. Hydroponics is another way of growing plants that do not require soil and this hydroponic gardeningis being used by countries like Australia. Being 30-50% faster in growth than the soil planting; these hydroponic growing systems actually uses water to mix the nutrients to get their way to the root system enabling the plant to utilize much energy for fruit making besides the search process(that plants do to search nutrients in the soil in non-hydroponics systems). Testing pH in these hydroponic growing systems is also important however mostly plants grow within the 5.8-6.8 pH range. Moreover to direct the nutrients to the plant various mediums are used like Rockwool and perlite. An Overview of the important Hydroponic Systems The hydroponic grow systems can generally be passive or active. Wick system being the non-recovery one carries the nutrient solution to the root system. Ebb and flow system on the other hand works with pump in the container hence becoming the active system. How to make a hydroponic system surely demands the appropriate medium, type and some necessary parts however, some innovative and best hydroponic systems are as follows: 1.      Vertical Hydroponic Gardening System These Hydroponic systems require good lighting and are best for small space gardeners. Various herbs and vegetables could be grown, with proper organic fertilizer. Many such vertical systems are developed with square buckets or round units stack, having particular characteristics using perlite commonly. The cost is usually $500 not benefiting commercial for production.See how to build this  here. 2.      A DWC system A deep water culture system within the range of $20 is cheap and reliable. It needs a rockwool cube, 5 gallon bucket with air pump and net cup of 6”. Watering the system in the starting days could keep it cool. The conversion of the rockwool into the DWC bucket is done when the leaves begin to sprout. 68 degree F is the temperature to water the plants. Get the tutorial here 3.      Hydroponic Drip Gardens The Ebb and Flow system is useful for home hydroponics drip gardening in which water pump with nutrients of some inches. It functions to full the tub and is drained back to the reservoir when it gets loaded. It may involve pump failure so a large reservoir is necessary. Such systems can also work with the fog and raft system.Get the details here 4.      Hydroponic Fodder System In order to save much cost and to get quality fodder hydroponic systems like these could be used. Fodder Pro 2.0 Feed Systems are suitable to grow any required nutrient,protein and enzymes-rich fodder thus bringing betterment to the poultry. It requires no fertilizers and could help in increasing the daily production. However the organic dairies can produce their own seeds.Get the detail here   5.       Indoor Hydroponic Gardens Antonio Scarponi has helped to describe how to maintain and develop numerous indoor hydroponic farms from a ledge herb to a vertical garden. ELIOO is the instruction manual for this purpose. Hydroponics using little space and being environmental...

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10 Free Langstroth and Warre or Top bar Beehive Plans

Posted by on May 12, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

10 Free Langstroth and Warre or Top bar Beehive Plans

10 Free Langstroth and Warre or Top bar Beehive Plans Posted by Farhan Ahsan on April 15, 2014 in Bee Keeping, Garden Projects | 26,877 Views | 3 Responses A beehive is a sanctuary in which the honey bees live. Today many people are building their own beehives in their houses or farms so that they can collect honey from beehive box. Before you think about keeping bees in the hives, the first thing you need to do is make a research which involves the complete guide for caring of the bees and also getting involved with them so that they won’t sting you. You should know how and what they should be fed, what are the risks, and what needs to be done. For a beginner, it is highly recommended that they start off with two bees hive only which allows you to interchange the frames when a colony becomes weaker with another one. There are many local Beekeepers associations which give courses and training to the amateurs for keeping bees. Once you have enough information, the first step is to make a beehive and then keep it in a place which doesn’t experiences much fast winds and is shady. The place should not be damp and the area should be somewhere the bees can be attracted so that they make their colonies, probably near some flower beds or trees, you can also purchase some bees. In order to allow the bees to have their colonies made, the most important is that you have to make your own beehive. There are two kinds of beehives which are most popular, one is the langstroth and other is top bar beehive; the vertical top bar hive (known as warre hive) or horizontal hive (like a Kenyan Top Bar Hive). The langstroth beehive is very common and is used all across the world for keeping bees and is also very easy to be build. The biggest advantage of this beehive is that they make their honeycomb in the frames which allows easy movements. The warre or the top bar has storied and modular design which is made from boxes which are stacked in a vertical position. They provide broad nesting and allow the breed to move through the sections. You can easily build your own beehive at your home with some simple tools and equipments. There are many beehive building plans on the internet published by different designers; this guide will help you with ten of the best plans for building your own beehive: 1-Top Bar Hive by p j chandler This is the top bar beehive plans PDF which can help the immature to build the best hive. The most important material you will need for building the beehive boxes is the Western red Cedar. They remain good for all the year and don’t require much maintenance; moreover they are cheap as well.  Other materials needed are timber, stainless steel screws, washers, nuts, bolts and other tools like saw, hammer and others. If you are a beginner then go for the 36” long box which will house two hives that is highly recommended for the amateurs.Read the detail plan 2-Simple And Easy Design by city boy hens This is an easy design for building a  beehive. You can make a box...

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